TerrySL5.jpg

Image icon TerrySL5.jpg
Media Folder: 
Description: 

Ngaujah stands on the hillside above Freetown, where he has been able to build a house of zinc metal on a small piece of land given to him by the government. He does not plan to return to Kono, the district where he was born and grew up (and where he was captured by rebels), because he believes that there are better opportunities for him and his family in Freetown, the nation’s capital.

“What has been done, has been done,” he says. “Nothing will bring back my hands . . . When I was amputated, during the three days after that [when] I was wandering in the bush, I was asking God to take my life. But God has a plan. At this time in my life, I think God has a plan.”

Lesson Plan Questions: 

• In the foreword to the second volume of War is Only Half the Story, Sara Terry writes, “The stories of aftermath are the stories of what it means to be human—in contrast to the stories of war, which all too often are the sad summary of what it means to be inhuman.” How does this image communicate the larger mission of the Aftermath Project?

• “What has been done, has been done,” Tamba Ngaujah says. “Nothing will bring back my hands . . . When I was amputated, during the three days after that [when] I was wandering in the bush, I was asking God to take my life. But God has a plan. At this time in my life, I think God has a plan.” What does he mean? What is he suggesting about the aftermath of war? What is he suggesting about how he carries on?

Photographers